Tool Kit Suggestions
#11
I went tool browsing again (what a surprise) and thought that the set numbers in Australia are probably not the same as any where else. That said, a good starter set is 3/8 drive in sizes 1/4 - 3/4" plus plain combination spanners in the same range. That should allow most jobs to be tackled. Then build up and down from there.
I would also suggest buy the best you can. Look at the finish carefully and compare brands. IME (experience) you don't get fantastic tools with a poor finish. Stanley is a good 'middle of the road' brand.

Any other pointers?
                                   
___________________________________________________________
                                    Good; Fast; Cheap.  Pick any two.
                                    The best mechanic you know holds the steering wheel when you drive  Thumbsup
                                     Current Rides:
                                     The Daughter's '70 Mach 1.  Nana
                                     My: 3 x E32; 2 x E38; X5 BMWs; 2 x BMW MINIs (R50 & R55);
                                     Daimler Sovereign(s)  S1 and X40     Cool
                                     Parts car:  E38 Confused    
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#12
Wow, this is a fairly broad top. I'll give it a try.

1) 1/4 inch drive sockets, metric, standard, shallow and deep. Swivel sockets are also nice but you can start with just a swivel adapter. Various extensions, nut driver handle, and ratchet (preferably a swivel head ratchet).

2) 3/8 inch drive sockets, metric, standard, shallow and deep. Swivel sockets are also nice but you can start with just a swivel adapter. Various extensions, speed handle, and a couple different style ratchets (at least one of them with a swivel head).

2) 1/2 inch drive sockets, metric, standard, shallow and deep. Swivel sockets are also nice but you can start with just a swivel adapter. Various extensions, couple different style ratchets (at least one of them with a swivel head), and a long breaker bar.

Since most of your work will be with 3/8 inch drive, focus more in that area.

3) Combination wrenches, standard 1/4" thru 1", metric 6mm thru 24mm. Standard lengths no fancy curved shaped or length wrenches to start with. Maybe some small ignition wrenches.

4) Screwdrivers, flat and Phillips (maybe some posi-drive Phillips). Do your best here or you will be stripping screw heads. Plus low end screwdrivers wear out fast. Also, be sure to include the large #3 size Phillips.

5) Various pliers, side cutters, and vise grip locking pliers. I find you'll often need two of a particular type to use at one time. Try to include one or two very large channel lock type pliers. They can be a life saver to hold onto a large object. Also a few different size adjustable wrenches to cover those missed wrench sizes.

6) Brake tools if you want to attempt brake work.

7) Some misc. stuff, a couple different size ball peen hammers, a small brass hammer, rubber or comp-thane hammer, a center punch and drift punch set, a few chisels, a brass drift punch to prevent sparks when a punch is needed around fuel, hack saw, some measuring tools, a few different size files, a couple different wire brushes, and very important a pry bar set. It sometimes takes brute force.

This list seems long, You don't need it all at once, but it should get you through most non-specialized jobs without getting stuck midway and needing another tool.

Best Regards,
Mike

I forgot, plus I don't know where to stop with this, but here are some more misc. items. Some of which are needed to tune up a motor.

8) 3/8" drive spark plug sockets, feeler gauges, spark plug gap tool, electrical wire and spark plug wire crimper and stripper, timing light (preferably with advance and tach), oil filter wrench of your choice, grease gun, and a telescoping mirror and telescoping magnet will save you from headaches. Don't forget safety glasses like I did in this list and MustangMike mentioned below.

Best Regards,
Mike
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#13
Thanks for bringing back a fun thread and thanks to MIFF for starting it! Now that we have a some great tool kit recommendations let's not forget our safety glasses/goggles. I ended up at the optometrist 3 times having metal removed from my eyes. That is one cost I failed to include in my restoration!


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#14
(03-04-2015, 11:20 AM)Mustangmike Wrote: Thanks for bringing back a fun thread and thanks to MIFF for starting it! Now that we have a some great tool kit recommendations let's not forget our safety glasses/goggles. I ended up at the optometrist 3 times having metal removed from my eyes. That is one cost I failed to include in my restoration!
Can't believe I forgot! Twice I've ended up at my doctors office to have metal removed from an eye. Once working on a car at home, and once when I was a technician at a GM dealership. I always wear them since the second incident.

Mustangmike, you've got me beat with metal in eye incidents.

Best Regards,
Mike
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#15
(03-04-2015, 03:22 PM)1969_Mach1 Wrote:
(03-04-2015, 11:20 AM)Mustangmike Wrote: Thanks for bringing back a fun thread and thanks to MIFF for starting it! Now that we have a some great tool kit recommendations let's not forget our safety glasses/goggles. I ended up at the optometrist 3 times having metal removed from my eyes. That is one cost I failed to include in my restoration!
Can't believe I forgot! Twice I've ended up at my doctors office to have metal removed from an eye. Once working on a car at home, and once when I was a technician at a GM dealership. I always wear them since the second incident.

Mustangmike, you've got me beat with metal in eye incidents.

Best Regards,
Mike

I have been told that I have magnets for eyeballs! Also, there was a ton of cutting and grinding that needed to be done on my car so based on that alone, it doesn't surprise me.
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#16
Let's not forget a fine selection of white phosphorus and fragmentation grenades for those occasional non-Ford vehicles we have to work on.
'71 mach, M-code 4SPD
'03 P-71 interceptor
'04 P-71 interceptor
02 superduty V-10

"They all run away when the Clevelands come out to play"
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#17
Thanks for the renewd interest guys. I was thinking in my original posts that some one just getting into this hobby/interest/obsession would buy either imperial or metric depending on their car. 3/8 drive is a good 'middle of the road' size to get started on simple jobs and servicing.

My kit stands me in a $44k so far and I'm still buying, but lets NOT sacre off the newbies.

Stuff like hammers, pliers, cutters, crimpers etc could follow on an 'as need' basis. Most blokes would have simple household tools anyway.

Good idea on the goggles and general safety gear. I must confess to putting those on just after I needed them!!

                                   
___________________________________________________________
                                    Good; Fast; Cheap.  Pick any two.
                                    The best mechanic you know holds the steering wheel when you drive  Thumbsup
                                     Current Rides:
                                     The Daughter's '70 Mach 1.  Nana
                                     My: 3 x E32; 2 x E38; X5 BMWs; 2 x BMW MINIs (R50 & R55);
                                     Daimler Sovereign(s)  S1 and X40     Cool
                                     Parts car:  E38 Confused    
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#18
(03-05-2015, 11:59 AM)Mach1FatherFigure Wrote: Good idea on the goggles and general safety gear. I must confess to putting those on just after I needed them!!

Roger that!
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#19
Yeah Mach1FatherFigure, I'm not too proud to admit my list is long. Most likely too long for getting started with your own auto repairs. I started tinkering with cars at a young age, 9-10 years old, helping older brothers and such. I don't recall thinking I just want to start by changing the oil, for example. So I guess my idea of a starter kit is different. Maybe this thread could be branched off into tool kits for servicing, tune-ups, etc. for those considering getting into their own repairs and starting with those types of jobs?
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#20
I can live with that. May be this could become a sticky, or a range of stickys in the DIY area?
                                   
___________________________________________________________
                                    Good; Fast; Cheap.  Pick any two.
                                    The best mechanic you know holds the steering wheel when you drive  Thumbsup
                                     Current Rides:
                                     The Daughter's '70 Mach 1.  Nana
                                     My: 3 x E32; 2 x E38; X5 BMWs; 2 x BMW MINIs (R50 & R55);
                                     Daimler Sovereign(s)  S1 and X40     Cool
                                     Parts car:  E38 Confused    
Reply



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